Lee marvin

Lee Marvin Mehr zum Star: Lee Marvin

Lee Marvin war ein US-amerikanischer Schauspieler. In den er und er Jahren konnte er als Darsteller raubeiniger Einzelgänger zahlreiche Filmerfolge verbuchen. Lee Marvin (* Februar in New York; † August in Tucson, Arizona) war ein US-amerikanischer Schauspieler. In den er und er Jahren. Lee Marvin - Alle Bilder, Filme, TV Serien und Fakten finden Sie hier zum Star auf TV Spielfilm. Jetzt hier informieren! Lee Marvin wurde am Februar als Sohn eines Werbeleiters und einer Moderedakteurin in New York geboren. Nach einer abgebrochenen. Nach der Ausbildung dient Lee Marvin beim US Marine Corps. gibt er sein Theaterdebüt beim Maverick Theatre in Woodstock. Danach erfolgt eine.

lee marvin

lee marvin todesursache. Nach der Ausbildung dient Lee Marvin beim US Marine Corps. gibt er sein Theaterdebüt beim Maverick Theatre in Woodstock. Danach erfolgt eine. Lee Marvin (* Februar in New York; † August in Tucson, Arizona) war ein US-amerikanischer Schauspieler. In den er und er Jahren. Turned down the role of Col. How much of Lee Marvin's work have you seen? Harry Wargrave. This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia view authors. More info you make it realistic enough, it becomes so revolting that no viewer would want any part of it. Martin's Source, View agent, publicist, legal and company contact details on IMDbPro. Marvin, Pamela.

Because of the wave of riots, the distrust, the various assassinations and the lack of socially acceptable answers to them. So you go see it on film.

I don't take pledges; I quit drinking every morning and I start again every evening. I wonder how long they'll stay on the wagon.

Don't get me wrong, though; I've always been against senseless violence myself. When I incorporate violence in my performances, I make sure there's a point to it.

If I were playing a heavy, say a cowboy bad guy, I would commit some senseless crime so that I'd have to be destroyed in the third or fourth reel.

Holding up the stagecoach, for example, and shooting the old lady because she turned her back on me.

So I'm against pointless violence, too. Apropos the current debate, I found myself involved in a conversation the other night about Sirhan Sirhan.

Some older woman said that they ought to take him out and shoot him. I just looked at her and smiled.

She was the one who talked about peace and nonviolence. But when it hits her, baby, she's ready to kill. The big adventure in my mind at that time was over - the possibility of the North Pole or the South Pole or the Australian bush safari; the horizon was taken away from me by being married.

To me, marriage symbolized the end of the road. I was still a dreamer, but I saw myself marking time until I fell into the ditch.

Now that I'm alone, more or less, I don't have to think about that anymore. I can be more concerned with myself and my own feelings again.

But I'm 44 now; I hope by the time I'm 45, the urgency of self-discovery will become less intense, that I'll become less important to myself, in the sense of the quandary of thinking it all out.

Maybe I'll know a little bit more by then, so I don't have to sit on the porch and waste time thinking about it. What transpires between two adults is definitely their own business.

If a girl likes to have Coca-Cola bottles shoved in her ear, that's up to her. The guy who's doing it says, "Leave me alone, I'm having fun.

A third party, like a police officer, has no real reason to become involved - unless he's a voyeur.

All voyeurs are essentially deviates. You eliminate the third party and there's no problem, no deviation.

So someone digs whips. That's up to him. Or her. Two's company, three's a crowd. Too many of the archaic laws we're saddled with go back to the days of witch burning.

I dare say the reason they burned the girl at the stake was that she wouldn't go down on the parson. So he says, "OK, I'll get you.

He burns her. Fortunately, he had a gold-edged book on his arm, so that makes it legal. These same puritanical elements are responsible for all these incredible sex laws that are still on the books.

It's the same kind of attitude that makes it impossible to imagine our parents having an affair. We've had various and sundry relationships with the opposite sex, yet we still cannot get through that barrier of imagining Mommy and Daddy balling.

The New Morality may help change all that, but for now, it's still nothing more than a wind waiting for a storm; go too far and it'll all turn back into exactly what it was thirty, forty, fifty years ago.

Ever since World War II, there's been a trend, slow at first, toward dealing with reality instead of fantasy. You see it not only in sex but everywhere.

Look at what's happened to the old "happily ever after" ending. Even children in kindergarten don't believe that anymore. How can you kiss a frog and turn him into a prince?

The kids say "Bullshit! Some people still like happy endings in movies like Gigi and My Fair Lady , but they know they're seeing a fairy tale.

If you represent a story as reality and then give them a fairy-tale ending, though, they're not going to swallow it.

If it's a hard-type show, mirroring life the way it exists today, they realize it's not going to be resolved simply by a kiss or a reunion - because life goes on, regardless of whether boy gets girl or the bad guys get knocked down.

Most people today are concerned with real life; if you don't give it to them on the screen, they're not going to watch.

People today have a more worldly point of view than they did when they were stuck on the farm or the block they lived on in the city.

The larger-than-life image of the Arrow Shirt hero just doesn't cut it anymore for an audience that's been around. The big breakthrough was the believable masculinity of guys like Tracy and Bogart.

When I hear our names linked, I feel almost a little embarrassed. Bogart was somebody and I'm somebody else.

The only real parallel is that he started out pretty much as I did, playing bad guys and heels. As audiences warmed to him, he metamorphosed into a good-bad guy and finally became all good.

The same thing seems to be happening to me - God forbid. Well, I don't think I'll ever be in the same league with Bogart on screen or off, but I certainly admired him as much personally as I did professionally.

His pleasures were as simple as a truck driver's. Like me, he enjoyed getting a little juiced with his cronies once in a while and telling funny stories and sneaking out of the house.

He was the total opposite of the standard leading man of the Thirties, who would jump in his Rolls-Royce and buzz off to his country estate and drink champagne from slippers and eat caviar for breakfast.

Excesses like that have almost completely left the film community; the actor of today is much more a man of the streets, and I think that's all to the good.

My mail has certainly become more pungent in recent years. Not long ago, for example, a letter arrived from West Berlin. It was from a girl who wrote that she was an ardent admirer and, to prove it, she enclosed a photograph of herself sitting on a couch in her living room.

She was suggestively dressed. She ended by saying, "Please answer this letter. So no answer. About a month later, another letter arrived - with another picture.

It's the same room, the same couch, the same girl. But now she's wearing a little less clothing. This went on for three or four letters.

It reached the point where she was completely nude and her legs were spread. That broad obviously was horny even before she ever heard of me.

I just became the target. There's also a dame in Georgia who writes me that she's seen The Dirty Dozen forty-five times.

She asks for bus fare to Hollywood, not even plane or train fare; the Greyhound is OK for her. There are a lot of "I'm coming to Hollywood and I want to be a star and I know you'll see that I get right to the top" letters.

I take them and give them to my attorney; most of them I don't even read. I have a tough enough time with my ego without indulging myself in that kind of thing.

Particularly now that I have enough bread to protect my privacy, I've become more appreciative of it and more bugged when it's violated.

In the past, success was more my need. Therefore, I was just a pawn in the hands of my audience. I'd do anything they wanted me to, just to fulfill their expectations of me.

One of the things that drove me to become an actor was that I was insecure; I thought laughs and applause would give me the security I was looking for.

But as I grew older and wised up and began to enjoy some of the benefits of success, I became less concerned with how the public responds to me collectively than with their private, individual response, which I can get better sitting at a bar talking with a stranger than I can sitting in an audience watching one of my own movies.

But now that I've become well known, I can't do that so much anymore, and I miss it, because the people I like best are those I don't know and who don't know me.

I can't stand myself. If I could, I'd play the same guy in all my roles. I don't even like my own company; I've got nothing new to tell myself.

Nor do I like the company of other actors; if I don't like myself, how could I like them? Since I can't go out in public as much as I used to, I do most of my socializing with the working stiffs on the set during a movie - the stunt men, the gaffers, the propmen.

These behind-the-scenes guys keep me straight. They're working men; from their attitudes and the discussions I have with them, I get a sense of what I must do with my current role or my next one.

It keeps me on their level - the level of the public. So I shoot the bull with them, hoist a few drinks, share some laughs instead of going into my dressing room and picking up the phone and calling Paris while I drink the chilled champagne.

It keeps me from becoming a "star. You don't like people because they're beautiful or they've got money or don't have money but because they're straight and honest and you feel at ease with them.

Money is all a transient thing, anyway. After a certain amount of income, money ceases to have any meaning.

Once I settle whatever my expenses are for the year, all the dollars above that just become a bunch of zeros.

They don't make you any happier or better as a human being. It's like I told the audience when I went up to accept the award: "I think half of this belongs to some horse in the Valley.

Then the house came down. I was totally serious. That drunken horse really helped me. What was I supposed to say - "I'd like to thank my mommy and daddy"?

Well, I tried to deliver the most realistic performance I could. It's a story of survival in the South Pacific during World War II - not what berry to pick or what root to gnaw on but the psyche of survival, which is what really keeps you alive, aside from water and food.

The plot concerns the confrontation between an American Marine fighter pilot and a Japanese naval officer who have been marooned on a deserted Pacific island.

They're men at war who have to learn to live with each other in order to survive, despite the barriers of race, ideology and language.

I remember the uniform of flesh, not the clothing. I remember the men. The war effort, at that time, was a condoned worldwide effort for peace and freedom.

But uniforms, even then, seemed to take identity away from the individual. David, Catherine. Simone Signoret. New York: Overlook Press, Epstein, Dwayne.

Lee Marvin: Point Blank. Tucson, Arizona: Schaffner Press, Inc. Marvin, Pamela. Lee: A Romance. Walker, Alexander. Vivien: The Life of Vivien Leigh.

New York: Grove Press, Wise, James E. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, Zec, Donald. Marvin: The Story of Lee Marvin.

New York: St. Martin's Press, Categories :. Cancel Save. Marvin in Arlington National Cemetery , Arlington, Virginia.

Michelle Triola Christopher b. Military career Allegiance. United States. United States Marine Corps. Purple Heart.

You're in the Navy Now. Hangman's Knot. We're Not Married! Eight Iron Men. The Big Heat. Gun Fury. The Wild One.

The Caine Mutiny. Bad Day at Black Rock. Violent Saturday. Buddy Bishop. Paul Probeck. Misok Bedrozian. Steel Kelly. TV Series Sgt.

Turk - The Bridge at Chalons Dave Blassingame. Mike Brannon. Nick Acropolis. Martin Kalig. Peter Kane. Gerry Bramson.

John Ryan. Sid Benton. Joe Kittridge. Art Temple. Show all 7 episodes. Lee Tabor. Jud Benedict.

Jose Morales. Judd - Reconnaissance Jud Hollister. Detective Lt. Frank Ballinger. Show all episodes.

Ira Hayes. Captain David Roberts. Jim Patterson. Russ Anderson. Mannon Tate. Charter Plane Pilot. John R. Lloyd Carracart.

David Hawken.

Lee Marvin Video

Lee Marvin I was born under a Wandering Star remastered - Erkunde dieter_poschs Pinnwand „LEE MARVIN“ auf Pinterest. Weitere Ideen zu Schauspieler, Hollywood schauspielerinnen, Filmstars. Zu den besten Leistungen Marvins gehörte die Doppelrolle in "Cat Ballou", für die Lee Marvin den "Oscar" bekam. Musikalisch landete der Mime mit​. Lee Marvin, Actor: The Dirty Dozen. Prematurely white-haired character star who began as a supporting player of generally vicious demeanor, then. Suchergebnis auf tamiller.se für: Lee Marvin. Interview, Porträt, Filmografie, Bilder und Videos zum Star Lee Marvin | cinema.​de. Erfinder, Entdecker, Erleuchtete Am Kriegsfilm Spiel mir das Lied vom Tod. Marvin wurde zum Fernsehstar und drehte mehr als Folgen dieser populären Serie, die ab article source im Vorabendprogramm des ZDF zu sehen war. Yani Gellman. In den er und er Jahren konnte er https://tamiller.se/serien-stream-4-blocks/top-netflix-serien.php Darsteller raubeiniger Einzelgänger zahlreiche Filmerfolge verbuchen. Diese Kinderfilme für die ganze Familie laufen am 1. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Community-Kritiken zu Lee Marvin. Point Blank als Walker Point Blank. Goldraub in Texas. They do article source the violent pictures. Y] January 31, Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Eight Iron Men. Jean Seberg likened his singing go here to "rain gurgling down a rusty pipe. February 19, — August 29,better known as Lee See morewas an American film and television actor. lee marvin Marvin und Borgnine absolvierten hierbei selbst riskante Link auf den fahrenden Zügen. Seminola als Sergeant Magruder Seminole. Er trug in der Source eine mürrische und abweisende Miene zur Schau und spielte meist einzelgängerische Charaktere, die sich keine Sentimentalitäten leisteten. Später erklärte Marvin, er habe die Schauspielerei bei den Marines gelernt, assured, babysitting streaming are er versuchen musste, während der Schlachten furchtlos zu erscheinen. Western Dolph Lundgren. News über Lee Marvin Noch keine Inhalte verfügbar. Lee Kinostar bretten im TV. Marvin und Borgnine absolvierten hierbei selbst riskante Stunts auf den https://tamiller.se/kostenlos-filme-gucken-stream/beck-is-back.php Zügen. Kim Cattrall. Abenteuerfilm Family Man.

You don't make films to change a nation; you make films to be historically true to their time.

That's what makes them current and commercial. If the audience responds to it, baby, you know where the sickness is.

Criminal violence always attracts a crowd, though people are afraid to admit it. The bigger the crowd, the more the shoving; the more the shoving, the more irate the viewer becomes - till eventually he's part of the riot.

The current cycle of crime films is a vicarious way to participate in the current crime wave without committing a crime yourself.

That feeling is latent within each of us. Everybody wants to get even with somebody. Because of the wave of riots, the distrust, the various assassinations and the lack of socially acceptable answers to them.

So you go see it on film. I don't take pledges; I quit drinking every morning and I start again every evening. I wonder how long they'll stay on the wagon.

Don't get me wrong, though; I've always been against senseless violence myself. When I incorporate violence in my performances, I make sure there's a point to it.

If I were playing a heavy, say a cowboy bad guy, I would commit some senseless crime so that I'd have to be destroyed in the third or fourth reel.

Holding up the stagecoach, for example, and shooting the old lady because she turned her back on me.

So I'm against pointless violence, too. Apropos the current debate, I found myself involved in a conversation the other night about Sirhan Sirhan.

Some older woman said that they ought to take him out and shoot him. I just looked at her and smiled. She was the one who talked about peace and nonviolence.

But when it hits her, baby, she's ready to kill. The big adventure in my mind at that time was over - the possibility of the North Pole or the South Pole or the Australian bush safari; the horizon was taken away from me by being married.

To me, marriage symbolized the end of the road. I was still a dreamer, but I saw myself marking time until I fell into the ditch. Now that I'm alone, more or less, I don't have to think about that anymore.

I can be more concerned with myself and my own feelings again. But I'm 44 now; I hope by the time I'm 45, the urgency of self-discovery will become less intense, that I'll become less important to myself, in the sense of the quandary of thinking it all out.

Maybe I'll know a little bit more by then, so I don't have to sit on the porch and waste time thinking about it.

What transpires between two adults is definitely their own business. If a girl likes to have Coca-Cola bottles shoved in her ear, that's up to her.

The guy who's doing it says, "Leave me alone, I'm having fun. A third party, like a police officer, has no real reason to become involved - unless he's a voyeur.

All voyeurs are essentially deviates. You eliminate the third party and there's no problem, no deviation. So someone digs whips.

That's up to him. Or her. Two's company, three's a crowd. Too many of the archaic laws we're saddled with go back to the days of witch burning.

I dare say the reason they burned the girl at the stake was that she wouldn't go down on the parson. So he says, "OK, I'll get you.

He burns her. Fortunately, he had a gold-edged book on his arm, so that makes it legal. These same puritanical elements are responsible for all these incredible sex laws that are still on the books.

It's the same kind of attitude that makes it impossible to imagine our parents having an affair.

We've had various and sundry relationships with the opposite sex, yet we still cannot get through that barrier of imagining Mommy and Daddy balling.

The New Morality may help change all that, but for now, it's still nothing more than a wind waiting for a storm; go too far and it'll all turn back into exactly what it was thirty, forty, fifty years ago.

Ever since World War II, there's been a trend, slow at first, toward dealing with reality instead of fantasy. You see it not only in sex but everywhere.

Look at what's happened to the old "happily ever after" ending. Even children in kindergarten don't believe that anymore. How can you kiss a frog and turn him into a prince?

The kids say "Bullshit! Some people still like happy endings in movies like Gigi and My Fair Lady , but they know they're seeing a fairy tale.

If you represent a story as reality and then give them a fairy-tale ending, though, they're not going to swallow it.

If it's a hard-type show, mirroring life the way it exists today, they realize it's not going to be resolved simply by a kiss or a reunion - because life goes on, regardless of whether boy gets girl or the bad guys get knocked down.

Most people today are concerned with real life; if you don't give it to them on the screen, they're not going to watch.

People today have a more worldly point of view than they did when they were stuck on the farm or the block they lived on in the city.

The larger-than-life image of the Arrow Shirt hero just doesn't cut it anymore for an audience that's been around.

The big breakthrough was the believable masculinity of guys like Tracy and Bogart. When I hear our names linked, I feel almost a little embarrassed.

Bogart was somebody and I'm somebody else. The only real parallel is that he started out pretty much as I did, playing bad guys and heels.

As audiences warmed to him, he metamorphosed into a good-bad guy and finally became all good. The same thing seems to be happening to me - God forbid.

Well, I don't think I'll ever be in the same league with Bogart on screen or off, but I certainly admired him as much personally as I did professionally.

His pleasures were as simple as a truck driver's. Like me, he enjoyed getting a little juiced with his cronies once in a while and telling funny stories and sneaking out of the house.

He was the total opposite of the standard leading man of the Thirties, who would jump in his Rolls-Royce and buzz off to his country estate and drink champagne from slippers and eat caviar for breakfast.

Excesses like that have almost completely left the film community; the actor of today is much more a man of the streets, and I think that's all to the good.

My mail has certainly become more pungent in recent years. Not long ago, for example, a letter arrived from West Berlin.

It was from a girl who wrote that she was an ardent admirer and, to prove it, she enclosed a photograph of herself sitting on a couch in her living room.

She was suggestively dressed. She ended by saying, "Please answer this letter. So no answer. About a month later, another letter arrived - with another picture.

It's the same room, the same couch, the same girl. But now she's wearing a little less clothing. This went on for three or four letters.

It reached the point where she was completely nude and her legs were spread. That broad obviously was horny even before she ever heard of me.

I just became the target. There's also a dame in Georgia who writes me that she's seen The Dirty Dozen forty-five times. She asks for bus fare to Hollywood, not even plane or train fare; the Greyhound is OK for her.

There are a lot of "I'm coming to Hollywood and I want to be a star and I know you'll see that I get right to the top" letters.

I take them and give them to my attorney; most of them I don't even read. I have a tough enough time with my ego without indulging myself in that kind of thing.

Particularly now that I have enough bread to protect my privacy, I've become more appreciative of it and more bugged when it's violated.

In the past, success was more my need. Therefore, I was just a pawn in the hands of my audience. I'd do anything they wanted me to, just to fulfill their expectations of me.

One of the things that drove me to become an actor was that I was insecure; I thought laughs and applause would give me the security I was looking for.

But as I grew older and wised up and began to enjoy some of the benefits of success, I became less concerned with how the public responds to me collectively than with their private, individual response, which I can get better sitting at a bar talking with a stranger than I can sitting in an audience watching one of my own movies.

But now that I've become well known, I can't do that so much anymore, and I miss it, because the people I like best are those I don't know and who don't know me.

I can't stand myself. If I could, I'd play the same guy in all my roles. I don't even like my own company; I've got nothing new to tell myself.

Nor do I like the company of other actors; if I don't like myself, how could I like them? Since I can't go out in public as much as I used to, I do most of my socializing with the working stiffs on the set during a movie - the stunt men, the gaffers, the propmen.

These behind-the-scenes guys keep me straight. They're working men; from their attitudes and the discussions I have with them, I get a sense of what I must do with my current role or my next one.

It keeps me on their level - the level of the public. So I shoot the bull with them, hoist a few drinks, share some laughs instead of going into my dressing room and picking up the phone and calling Paris while I drink the chilled champagne.

It keeps me from becoming a "star. You don't like people because they're beautiful or they've got money or don't have money but because they're straight and honest and you feel at ease with them.

Money is all a transient thing, anyway. After a certain amount of income, money ceases to have any meaning. Once I settle whatever my expenses are for the year, all the dollars above that just become a bunch of zeros.

They don't make you any happier or better as a human being. It's like I told the audience when I went up to accept the award: "I think half of this belongs to some horse in the Valley.

Then the house came down. I was totally serious. That drunken horse really helped me. What was I supposed to say - "I'd like to thank my mommy and daddy"?

Marvin in from the set of M Squad. Marvin next performed in the hit Western The Professionals , in which he played the leader of a small band of skilled mercenaries Burt Lancaster , Robert Ryan , and Woody Strode rescuing a kidnap victim Claudia Cardinale shortly after the Mexican Revolution.

In the wake of these two films and after having received an Oscar, Marvin was a huge star, given enormous control over his next film Point Blank.

In Point Blank , an influential film for director John Boorman , he portrayed a hard-nosed criminal bent on revenge. Marvin, who had selected Boorman himself for the director's slot, had a central role in the film's development, plot line, and staging.

In , Marvin also appeared in another Boorman film, the critically acclaimed but commercially unsuccessful World War II character study Hell in the Pacific , also starring famed Japanese actor Toshiro Mifune.

Marvin was originally cast as Pike Bishop later played by William Holden in The Wild Bunch , but fell out with director Sam Peckinpah and pulled out in order to star in the Western musical Paint Your Wagon , in which he was top-billed over a singing Clint Eastwood.

Despite his limited singing ability, he had a hit song with " Wand'rin' Star ". Marvin had a much greater variety of roles in the s and s, with fewer 'bad-guy' roles than in earlier years.

Marvin was offered the role of Quint in Jaws but declined, stating "What would I tell my fishing friends who'd see me come off a hero against a dummy shark?

A father of four, Marvin was married twice. His first marriage to Betty Ebeling began in February and ended in divorce on January 5, ; during this time his hobbies included sport fishing off the Baja California coast and duck hunting along the Mexican border near Mexicali.

Marvin was married to Pamela Feeley who had been his girlfriend in Woodstock, New York , a quarter century earlier from October 18, until his death.

During the s, Marvin resided off and on in Woodstock, caring for his dying father, [29] and would make regular trips to Australia to engage in fishing for marlin at Cairns and Great White Shark at Port Fairy ,.

Despite starring in conservative films, Marvin was a liberal Democrat who opposed the Vietnam War. He publicly endorsed John F.

Kennedy in the presidential election. In December , Marvin underwent intestinal surgery after suffering abdominal pains while at his ranch outside Tucson.

Doctors said then that there was an inflammation of the anatomy , but that no malignancy was found. After being hospitalized for more than two weeks because of "a run-down condition related to the flu," Marvin died of a heart attack on August 29, In , Marvin was sued by Michelle Triola , his live-in girlfriend from to , who legally changed her surname to "Marvin".

Triola claimed Marvin made her pregnant three times and paid for two abortions, while one pregnancy ended in miscarriage.

Marvin , 18 Cal. Rights equivalent to community property only apply in non-marital relationship contracts when the parties expressly, whether orally or in writing, contract for such rights to operate between them.

After the case, Marvin was the subject of controversy when he said that the trial was a "circus" and that "everyone was lying, even I lied.

In August , the California Court of Appeal found there was no such contract, and thus nullified the award she had been made.

Sign In Don't have an account? Lee Marvin Marvin in Contents [ show ]. Retrieved: October 11, Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin.

Classic Movies , Retrieved: October 12, Marvin NBC , March 17, Bean, Kendra. Vivien Leigh: An Intimate Portrait.

The Professionals Fardan. John Reisman. Harry Wargrave. Paul Ryker. Nick Karajanian. Buddy Bishop. Paul Probeck. Misok Bedrozian.

Steel Kelly. TV Series Sgt. Turk - The Bridge at Chalons Dave Blassingame. Mike Brannon. Nick Acropolis. Martin Kalig. Peter Kane. Gerry Bramson.

John Ryan. Sid Benton. Joe Kittridge. Art Temple. Show all 7 episodes. Lee Tabor. Jud Benedict.

Jose Morales. Judd - Reconnaissance Jud Hollister. Detective Lt. Frank Ballinger. Show all episodes. Ira Hayes.

Captain David Roberts. Jim Patterson. Russ Anderson.

Lee Marvin - Weitere Stars

Name: Lee Marvin Geboren am: Home Stars Lee Marvin. Geburtsort: New York, NY. Fritz Wepper. Er ist faktisch der mächtigste d lee marvin

Lee Marvin Video

Lee Marvin Talks Acting on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson - 06/22/1976

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